Good Tweet, Bad Tweet

A couple weeks ago, my parents and grandparents stumbled their way from Los Angeles to the District. Somewhere in between getting lost on the wrong side of the Key Bridge and chowing down at some of DC’s finest, I got stuck on a topic that I never talk about–social media.

Techies aren’t just born, they are bred.

I filled the 8 days I shared with my family with talk of tweets and pins, teaching them how to check-in on Facebook and explaining Twitter and Pinterest. The result? I was tagged into every restaurant we went to 3 times, and my grandpa (@MillenniumMayor) has been spam tweeting Karl Rove, Glenn Beck, Martha Maccallum, and Sarah Palin.

It’s not surprising when social media noobs like my family ask how to do Twitter the right way. I hesitate to say that there is a right or wrong way to tweet, but there are definitely better, more effective ways. Have I lost you?

Don’t fret–I have a perfect DC meets LA way to explain!


Bad Tweet

Earlier today, the US Embassy in Brussels tweeted:

The tweet references the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) which had an event on the topic of women and counterterrorism (#WomenAndCT) yesterday afternoon. It’s a well-done tweet, with the exception of using the wrong handle for CSIS. On the other hand, CSIS does a terrible job with their response:

I have a ton of respect for (and would love to work for) the Center for Strategic and International Studies, but this tweet is simply bad form. CSIS has forwarded a modified tweet from the US Embassy in Brussels that looks like it was written by Justin Bieber after he raided his parent’s liquor cabinet. Why did they shorten keywords like instrument and expert and remove the space between 4 and peace, but leave important and according complete? This tweet could have read:

MT‏ @usembbrussels #Women are important weapon against terror & instrument 4 peace say experts @CSIS http://bit.ly/HXg9jG #terrorism #Verveer

Is this better? What do you think?

Good Tweet

If you are scoffing at seeing my own face listed under the title of good tweet, fear not. My vanity has not yet taken over.
Earlier this week, I had an exchange on Twitter which I think demonstrates best practices for political and advocacy Twitter usage. As an extra bonus, it also includes one of my favorite topics, Kim Kardashian!

Kim Kardashian took headlines by storm this week when she said on her reality show that she might consider running for Mayor of Glendale someday. The city of Glendale, sometimes referred to as “Little Armenia” by locals, is very close to where I grew up–in the same congressional district, in fact. Congressman Adam Schiff represents the district, and so I thought I’d poke a little fun at him and the situation.

I never expected a response, and yet within 24 hours:

What can politicians take away from this tweet? The response (1) demonstrated that he was actually listening and engaging rather than just broadcasting, (2) took the opportunity to share one of his positions that his constituents feel strongly about (Armenian Genocide), and (3) it felt personal and real, not stiff or like a form letter. These are the kind of interactions that politicians should be aiming for to maximize the impact of their online discussions.

But the conversation didn’t end there. No, Kim Kardashian didn’t chime in. @CharaGG, however, did:

The link posted goes to an indiegogo website that asks people to donate to her documentary project that deals with Armenian genocide. My guess is that she either follows Rep. Schiff due to his strong support of Armenian Genocide recognition, or she searched for Armenian genocide on Twitter and inserted herself into relevant conversations. In doing so, she tapped into a conversation that was already occurring online with people who care about a topic. This is good social networking. This is digital engagement.

Until next time.

A toast, “To Mayor Kardashian, may the stress of politics not make her want to pull her own extensions out.”

“The people drawn to Twitter are people on the cutting edge, the real nerds who are resentful of the fact that the general population have found and taken over Facebook”

~Steve Dotto, host of Dotto Tech

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I Put the Social in Social Media

imgresThey say the first step is admitting you have a problem.

I wrote a blog about QR codes, my Thanksgiving had a hashtag, and I sleep with my iPhone under my pillow — My name is Liane and I’m a technoholic.

When I sat down to write today, I intended this blog to be a defense of the social aspect of social media. Then, I remembered the cardinal rule of writing: know your audience. If you are reading this BLOG, chances are you’re pretty okay with social media as you probably got here via Twitter, Facebook, or e-mail. A defense of social media belongs in a newspaper….and that newspaper belongs in a museum where other old, historic things go to be forgotten.

Instead, I’m going to invite you to share in the joy that is Social Media Week DC!

From February 13th-17th, cities all over the world (Hamburg, Hong Kong, London, Miami, New York, Paris, San Francisco, Sao Paulo, Singapore, Tokyo, Toronto, & Washington DC) are participating in Social Media Week. As a girl with a passion for new media, I could not pass up the opportunity to sign up for a couple of the amazing events happening here in DC. Hopefully, I’ll also have enough time this week to blog about the events, but if not be sure to follow me on Twitter @liane_w for live tweeting from the following events:

Monday, February 13, 2012
Nothing! — I need to work on the formative research for my Media, Development, & Globalization project :/
Tuesday,  February 14, 2012

Digital platforms have changed the media landscape forever, but how has it changed the way the media covers politics? We’ll ask a panel  from Gannet, National Journal, ABC News and Politico as they discuss 2012 election coverage.

The social media landscape has changed drastically since 2008. We’ll hear directly from panelists from Google, Twitter and Facebook as they delve into the tools and innovations that candidates and campaigns have utilized as the 2012 campaign heats up.
Wednesday, February 15, 2012

We will explore the driving forces that have been evolutionary markers for social media, transitioning it from the past to the present, and giving us a glimpse into the future. This session is for those wishing to understand where their organization is placed on the evolutionary timeline, what is next for social media, and why. In our interactive discussion, we will reminisce about famous flops, share success stories, and discuss the future of what social media can be for Government agencies and Non-governmental organizations.

As we look back on the impact social media has had on the healthcare industry over the past year, we see dramatic growth in social media adoption by health care consumers, providers, and organizations. While the industry has taken a giant leap forward into the brave new social media world, we’ve only scratched the surface of what is yet to come.

So what does the future hold? Join thought leaders from Eli Lilly, Inspire, Ogilvy and Ozmosis as we explore the positive impact social media has made throughout the healthcare system.  Together, we will examine how patients, providers and healthcare organizations have leveraged social tools to enhance communication, promote education, improve the delivery of care, and reduce growing costs.

Thursday, February 16, 2012

How does social media change how statecraft is practiced in the 21st century? Who’s participating and why? What have been some lessons learned from the pioneers who have logged on to listen and engage? Three representatives from the U.S. Department of State will share case studies and professional experiences gleaned directly from the virtual trenches.

This panel discussion and networking event will introduce you to some of the people behind “American Censorship Day” and the “Internet Blackout Day” for a candid discussion discuss their the strategies and tactics that lead up to  over 14 million people to contacting Congress in a single day.

We will discuss how Internet experts, non-profit organizations and entrepreneurs from across the political spectrum came together to successfully derail SOPA and PIPA and offer a glimpse into what this means for future advocacy campaigns.

Friday, February 17, 2012

While Sean Parker may predict that social media will determine the outcome of the 2012 election, governance is another story entirely. Meaningful use of social media by Congress remains challenged by a number of factors, not least an online identity ecosystem that has not provided Congress with ideal means to identify constituents online. The reality remains that when it comes to which channels influence Congress, in-person visits and individual emails or phone calls are far more influential with congressional staffers.

“People think it’s always an argument in Washington,” said Matt Lira, Director of Digital for the House Majority Leader. “Social media can change that. We’re seeing a decentralization of audiences that is built around their interests rather than the interests of editors. Imagine when you start streaming every hearing and making information more digestible. All of a sudden, you get these niche audiences. They’re not enough to sustain a network, but you’ll get enough of an audience to sustain the topic. I believe we will have a more engaged citizenry as a result.”

This conversation with Lira (and other special guests, as scheduling allows) will explore more than how social media is changing politics in Washington. We’ll look at its potential to can help elected officials and other public servants make better policy decisions.

Alright, enough of that! I will try and update as much as possible about the fascinating information I learn this week. Let me know if you want more information/want to hear about a specific event/really love newspapers–yeah, right. Stay tuned 🙂

In honor of Charles Darwin’s birthday, today’s extremely appropriate blog quote:

“In the long history of humankind those who learned to collaborate and improvise most effectively have prevailed.”
~ Charles Darwin